RonAmok!

The adventures of an analog engineer and digital storyteller who studies emerging networks and their impact on the great game of business.
Jun 18, 2008

Whenever I’m presenting New and Social Media topics to a group, I’ve found that the audience falls into three categories:

  1. Those who “Get it”— a small group of people who latch onto the message. They typically embrace new technologies and are willing to try new ways of doing things. I’ve also found that these folks generally have very good “people skills,” are comfortable talking with others, enjoy sharing opinions, and treat people with respect.
  2. The Traditionals are people who not only don’t “get it,” but refuse to “get it.” The Traditional is a control freak. Someone who has been trained in controlling the corporate message. Any hints at relinquishing this control sends their hearts into abnormal heart rhythms. Traditionals will use any disruptive tactic they can to derail New Media related discussions. I’ve heard them all: “New and Social Media doesn’t work with my customers,” or “That stuff only works in (fill in the blank).”
  3. “Running With Scissors” People “get it” but in a very dangerous way. These are the same folks who’ll dive into a pool without knowing where the deep end is. They’re always willing to try something new, but are so excited about the tools and technologies that they forget why they are using the tools in the first place. Running With Scissors folks need a special type of manager, someone to pull back on the reigns so that nobody puts an eye out.

Of the three, the Traditionals are the toughest to deal with. I’ve spent many a day butting heads with them, but was really surprised when one of my favorite authors took the Traditional’s side. David Meerman Scott produced this short (1:22) video proving the Traditionals right…that not all businesses use the Internet to find their products and services.

I stand corrected:-)

Tags:

Filed under: Social Media

Comments

Hey Ron.

I love your categories. And thanks for the link to my video. I’m now back in Boston and the three days ago I shot that video seems like a long time ago!

I’ve got one more category for you to consider adding to your list: The “Fadders” THese are the people who resist all this newfangled stuff because they think that it is a “fad”. I’ve heard “Blogging is a fad”. “Twitter is a fad”. “Facebook is a fad”.

Right. Whatever.

David

David Meerman Scott
June 19, 2008

Hey Ron.

I love your categories. And thanks for the link to my video. I’m now back in Boston and the three days ago I shot that video seems like a long time ago!

I’ve got one more category for you to consider adding to your list: The “Fadders” THese are the people who resist all this newfangled stuff because they think that it is a “fad”. I’ve heard “Blogging is a fad”. “Twitter is a fad”. “Facebook is a fad”.

Right. Whatever.

David

David Meerman Scott
June 19, 2008

Hi David,

I’ve found that “Fadders” fall into the “Traditional” category. Page 27 of The Traditional’s Handbook contains every combination and permutation of using the term “fad.”

Keep up the good work!

R~

ronploof
June 19, 2008

Hi David,

I’ve found that “Fadders” fall into the “Traditional” category. Page 27 of The Traditional’s Handbook contains every combination and permutation of using the term “fad.”

Keep up the good work!

R~

Ron
June 19, 2008

I found both David’s blog posting and yours to be really funny. The only problem is that the Traditionals will not find your post or Daqvid’s post because they are not online (their customers are). The Traditionals are the definition of insanity, trying to do the same thing over and over however, expecting a different out come each time. Sad.

Ozzie Wallace
June 19, 2008

I found both David’s blog posting and yours to be really funny. The only problem is that the Traditionals will not find your post or Daqvid’s post because they are not online (their customers are). The Traditionals are the definition of insanity, trying to do the same thing over and over however, expecting a different out come each time. Sad.

Ozzie Wallace
June 19, 2008

Funny stuff! Thanks for the link to David’s blog. I’ve subscribed to his feed also and so my list of new media advisors has just grown. 🙂 Cheers.

Ken Wetherell
June 19, 2008

Funny stuff! Thanks for the link to David’s blog. I’ve subscribed to his feed also and so my list of new media advisors has just grown. 🙂 Cheers.

Ken Wetherell
June 19, 2008

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