RonAmok!

The adventures of an analog engineer and digital storyteller who studies emerging networks and their impact on the great game of business.
Jul 28, 2008

Paul Gillin and David Strom have a podcast called MediaBlather. One of their recent guests was Social Media maven Chris Brogan, who I still owe a beer to, BTW, but that’s another story.

The conversation turned to Twitter, a microblogging service that I’ve used, yet never really grasped fully– until Chris offered his always down-to-earth insight. Instead of answering the Twitter-recommended question: “What are you doing?” he suggested answering a different one: “What are you thinking?” Instantaneously I saw the value of Twitter — not only to my followers, but also to me.

My followers wanna know what this New Media Evangelist is thinking about, the problems I’m trying to solve, and the solutions I’m practicing. And for me? I’ve been searching for a note-taking, service — a place to document thoughts for future reference. Through Chris’s advice, I found a way to kill two birds with one New Media stone.

Which brings me to this post. By combining Chris’s question with my post on Brevity, I thought that it might be interesting to document the process I went through to post a tweet:

Question: What am I thinking?:

Answer Number 1: “Throughout the course of human history, corporations have perfected the art of creating content. Unfortunately for them, according to Google, they are good at creating bad content.”

Analysis: Cool, but 40 characters over the limit 🙁

Question: What am I thinking?

Answer #2: “Throughout history, corporations have perfected the art of creating content. Unfortunately, according to Google, they’re good at creating bad content.”

Analysis: Better, but still 10 characters over the 140 character limit.

Question: What am I thinking?

Answer #3: Throughout history, corporations have perfected content creation. Unfortunately, according to Google, they’re good at creating bad content.

Analysis: Finished with one (1) character to spare! But can I pare it down even more?

Question: What am I thinking?:

Answer #4: “Over time, companies have perfected content creation. Unfortunately, according to Google, they create bad content.”

Analysis: Now we’re cooking. Completed the thought with 26 characters to spare — a 36% character savings since the original. But did I cut too close to the bone? I think some of the nuances were lost.

Question: What am I thinking?:

Answer #5: “Over time, companies have perfected content creation. Unfortunately, according to Google, they’ve perfected the creation of bad content.

Analysis: Captured the thought with four (4) characters to spare. Time is money, so I hit “send.”

Thanks to Chris, Paul, and David!

Tags:

Filed under: Content Development

Comments

You’re a Twitter novice, so I’ll cut you some slack, but man, that’s a lot of thinking and a long way to go for a twitter post. I view Twitter more as a stream of consciousness kind of thing. Every post doesn’t have to be completely thought out and perfected. That’s more of what a blog does. Twitter is more spontaneous. Not to say that Twitter posts should not or cannot be thoughtful.

I think that’s why business has trouble dealing with things like Twitter. Twitter is like clay in that it has some physical properties but it can be formed and worked into almost anything you want it to be. Different people use twitter differently and people interpret the question what are you doing differently. Some ignore it altogether. I’ve even seen podcast fiction writers experiment with telling a story on Twitter 140 characters at a time. What is Twitter? I don’t know, can you stick your hand into the same river twice?

David Jacobs
July 28, 2008

You’re a Twitter novice, so I’ll cut you some slack, but man, that’s a lot of thinking and a long way to go for a twitter post. I view Twitter more as a stream of consciousness kind of thing. Every post doesn’t have to be completely thought out and perfected. That’s more of what a blog does. Twitter is more spontaneous. Not to say that Twitter posts should not or cannot be thoughtful.

I think that’s why business has trouble dealing with things like Twitter. Twitter is like clay in that it has some physical properties but it can be formed and worked into almost anything you want it to be. Different people use twitter differently and people interpret the question what are you doing differently. Some ignore it altogether. I’ve even seen podcast fiction writers experiment with telling a story on Twitter 140 characters at a time. What is Twitter? I don’t know, can you stick your hand into the same river twice?

David Jacobs
July 28, 2008

Nice introduction. You’ve both given me something to think about. Now I’ll go check out Twitter for the 1st time.

That was 115 characters. 🙂

Ken Wetherell
July 28, 2008

Nice introduction. You’ve both given me something to think about. Now I’ll go check out Twitter for the 1st time.

That was 115 characters. 🙂

Ken Wetherell
July 28, 2008

David, my very good friend.

You’re a fishbowler, so I’ll cut you some slack:-)

For the first time, I’ve found a Twitter analogy that works for me — with the way I work and the type of content that I like to create. As a writer, I put a lot of thought into every post and every podcast. It’s a natural progression for me translate that to a tweet. Perhaps it’s more trendy to just rattle stuff off the cuff, but that’s not me. Is there not room in Twitter for my form of Tweet?

ronploof
July 29, 2008

David, my very good friend.

You’re a fishbowler, so I’ll cut you some slack:-)

For the first time, I’ve found a Twitter analogy that works for me — with the way I work and the type of content that I like to create. As a writer, I put a lot of thought into every post and every podcast. It’s a natural progression for me translate that to a tweet. Perhaps it’s more trendy to just rattle stuff off the cuff, but that’s not me. Is there not room in Twitter for my form of Tweet?

Ron
July 28, 2008

I tried Twitter when it first came on the scene and grew weary of it rather quickly. Now I use it primarily as another broadcast point for blog posts. You know, for those folks who choose to “follow” you on Twitter instead of subscribing to your RSS. (I use Alex King’s “Twitter Tools” for WordPress by the way: http://alexking.org/projects/wordpress)

Works great for my wacky site experiment Bacon Today. 45 “followers” strong – ha!

Corey
July 29, 2008

I tried Twitter when it first came on the scene and grew weary of it rather quickly. Now I use it primarily as another broadcast point for blog posts. You know, for those folks who choose to “follow” you on Twitter instead of subscribing to your RSS. (I use Alex King’s “Twitter Tools” for WordPress by the way: http://alexking.org/projects/wordpress)

Works great for my wacky site experiment Bacon Today. 45 “followers” strong – ha!

Corey
July 28, 2008

Ron,

There is absolutely room your your kind of tweet and I know that’s the kind of new media person you are. That’s the beautiful thing about it, everyone takes a different approach to it.

David Jacobs
July 30, 2008

Ron,

There is absolutely room your your kind of tweet and I know that’s the kind of new media person you are. That’s the beautiful thing about it, everyone takes a different approach to it.

David Jacobs
July 30, 2008

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