RonAmok!

The adventures of an analog engineer and digital storyteller who studies emerging networks and their impact on the great game of business.

Technologies in and of themselves are not very interesting. What people do with them, however, is. I’m fascinated with how people USE new technologies in their day-to-day lives.

Take Twitter for example. Standalone, the technology is new and interesting. But it wasn’t until I began using a desktop Twitter client called Tweetdeck that I noticed some self-behavioral changes.

I’ve found that the TwitScoop column in Tweetdeck is where I get all of my breaking news. Consisting of a tag cloud, the column represents Twitter’s trending topics. The larger the word, the more frequently it’s being used in Twitter-based conversations.

Last Tuesday, I returned to my computer after a few hours of client meetings to find the image above waiting for me. It didn’t take much imagination to see that the California Supreme Court had issued its ruling on “Prop 8,” the measure that banned same sex marriages in last November’s elections. The ruling caused such an emotional response that the Twitterverse lit-up with every conceivable opinion.

Tweetdeck was where I first heard about the plane that splash-landed in the Hudson. Tweetdeck is where I first heard saw the words “Mumbai” and “terrorists” — both examples arriving in Tweetdeck long before the mainstream press had a reporter on the scene. It has become the defacto place for your New Media Evangelist to get his breaking news.

How are New Media technologies influencing your day-to-day habits?

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Filed under: Measurement

Comments

A week or two ago I got a tweet about a gunman on the UCI campus. Pretty soon I had heard from a freind who’s sister goes to UCI telling me details of what happened (wasn’t a gunman, it was a paintballer). It wasn’t until an hour later that the local press was covering the story, long after it was all over. You don’t get news faster than that without being there. Of course, you also have no idea if the news is real or not.

Bryan Howland
June 1, 2009

A week or two ago I got a tweet about a gunman on the UCI campus. Pretty soon I had heard from a freind who’s sister goes to UCI telling me details of what happened (wasn’t a gunman, it was a paintballer). It wasn’t until an hour later that the local press was covering the story, long after it was all over. You don’t get news faster than that without being there. Of course, you also have no idea if the news is real or not.

Bryan Howland
June 1, 2009

[…] May 27th, my Tweetdeck/Twitscoop window displayed two words looming large: “Kirstie” and “Alley.” At first I feared […]

RonAmok! » Don’t call me Kristie!
July 28, 2010

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