RonAmok!

The adventures of an analog engineer and digital storyteller who studies emerging networks and their impact on the great game of business.

tweet_birdsA few weeks ago, I attended The Design Automation Conference, the Big Daddy of all conferences in the Electronic Design Automation Industry. If you’re an electrical engineer responsible for chip design, this is the place to learn about the tools required to get your job done.

I was invited by Karen Bartleson of Synopsys to host a session in the company’s Conversation Central booth, but the highlight of the day came immediately after my session when a man, slightly out of breath, rushed into the room and announced that some Synopsys guy was about to start his presentation in a few minutes.

“Can you tweet about it?” he asked Karen.

Without looking up from her screen, Karen said, “Sure. Tell me something interesting about the talk.”

The man stood in the doorway, stumped for an answer. The perplexed expression on his face resembled that of a person trying to calculate the cube root of 37 without the aid of a calculator.

The man knew that Karen had built an audience on Twitter, and as a marketeer, his goal was to deliver his message to it. However, through her question, Karen helped him understand that this audience was different, because she had built it, Twitter-follower by Twitter-follower. By asking for “something interesting,” she was simply demonstrating her commitment to publishing quality content to that audience.

Companies adopting New Media channels such as Twitter can learn a huge lesson from New Media Evangelist Karen Bartleson. Not only must they build an audience through publishing compelling content, they must also continue to respect that audience. By doing so, not only will the existing audience remain loyal, but the company will likely add a few more readers/followers along the way.

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Filed under: Content Development

Comments

This vignette wraps up everything that’s wrong about tech marketing and what the incredible potential is if marketers figure out how to adapt to social media. I’ve talked to more than a dozen companies that don’t get that just because they are saying something doesn’t mean that anyone wants to listen. Karen is one of the few that gets it and as long as there is one, there will be more.

Lou Covey
August 26, 2009

This vignette wraps up everything that’s wrong about tech marketing and what the incredible potential is if marketers figure out how to adapt to social media. I’ve talked to more than a dozen companies that don’t get that just because they are saying something doesn’t mean that anyone wants to listen. Karen is one of the few that gets it and as long as there is one, there will be more.

Lou Covey
August 25, 2009

That is a great story. I can imagine how someone may just want to 'get the word out somehow' about a time sensitive situation. I could feel the calmness in her request, “tell me something interesting.” I can identify with that guy running around trying to manage many things. Thanks to Karen and you for the great reminder on cherishing your friends in your network.

danronken
August 27, 2009

That is a great story. I can imagine how someone may just want to 'get the word out somehow' about a time sensitive situation. I could feel the calmness in her request, “tell me something interesting.”
I can identify with that guy running around trying to manage many things. Thanks to Karen and you for the great reminder on cherishing your friends in your network.

danronken
August 27, 2009

That is a great story. I can imagine how someone may just want to ‘get the word out somehow’ about a time sensitive situation. I could feel the calmness in her request, “tell me something interesting.”
I can identify with that guy running around trying to manage many things. Thanks to Karen and you for the great reminder on cherishing your friends in your network.

danronken
August 27, 2009

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